Water Quality and Ecology
7:42 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Streams Removed from Impaired Waters List Because of Better Farming

Bird Creek in northeast Oklahoma is one of nine streams no longer considered impaired due to high turbidity.
Credit GRANGER MEADOR / FLICKR

The drought goes on, and resources are strained, but there is some positive news to report about Oklahoma’s water.

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Term limits spells the end for some at the Capitol
8:40 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Lawmakers Say Goodbye in This Week's 23rd & Lincoln

Lawmakers hope to be done with business this Friday. Because of term limits this could be the final weekend for some of them.

Here’s Marie Price with this week’s 23rd and Lincoln.

You can find more of Marie’s insights on the capitol jrlr.net.

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
8:22 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Neighbors Find Comfort In Community After 2013 Moore Tornado

Tornado Survivors Alise Newby and Micah Moody find comfort in being neighbors after their homes were destroyed May 20, 2013
Credit Kate Carlton / Oklahoma Tornado Project

One year ago this week, a deadly EF-5 tornado swept through Moore, Oklahoma, taking the lives of 24 people and destroying over 11-hundred homes. For many people, this week marks a painful reminder of the damage. For others, the year anniversary is an opportunity to put the devastation behind them with the support of their peers. Kate Carlton reports. 

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NPR Ed
6:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Why Education Is The Most Important Revolution Of Our Time

Everything I needed to know about learning, I learned in preschool?
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:37 pm

Learning is something people, like other animals, do whenever our eyes are open. Education, though, is uniquely human, and right now it's at an unusual point of flux.

By some accounts, education is a $7 trillion global industry ripe for disruption. Others see it as almost a sacred pursuit — a means of nurturing developing minds while preserving tradition. Around the world, education means equal rights and opportunity. People risk their lives for it every day.

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Local News
12:11 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Anthropologist Who Identified Mass Graves Dies

Clyde Snow in 1986.
Credit David Longstreet / Associated Press

Clyde Snow, a forensic anthropologist who worked on cases ranging from the assassination of President John F. Kennedy to mass graves in Argentina, has died. He was 86.

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Interviews
10:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

Hortense McClinton graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s and became the first black professor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Howard University

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 4:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

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It's All Politics
5:30 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Do We Need This Government Agency? 'Let Me Google That'

Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., is a longtime deficit hawk, releasing an annual Wastebook that points a critical finger at billions of dollars in questionable government spending.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:48 am

Why would anyone pay for something when the exact same thing is available for free? The answer seems obvious, yet the question remains relevant for an obscure federal agency still pursuing its Cold War mission in the age of the search engine.

Say you wanted to know more about supersonic retro-propulsion wind tunnel testing. Or ancient land use in the Maya Lowlands. Or a 1996 hazardous waste characteristics scoping study. OK, you don't really want to know about these things, but someone did, and someone did the research.

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3:44 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Parched: A New Dust Bowl Forms in the Heartland

Lead in text: 
National Geographic looks at the Oklahoma panhandle and asks, "Are we having another Dust Bowl?"
Four years into an unrelentingly mean, hot drought, a new Dust Bowl engulfs the same region that was the geographic heart of the original.
Local News
6:57 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Okla. Sheriff's Tweets Among Most Popular In US

Credit twitter.com/OkCountySheriff

Oklahoma County's sheriff wants basketball fans and the Oklahoma City Thunder to know that streaking is illegal — but cheering, loudly, for the NBA team has yet to land anyone in the local jail.

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Reading, Crumbling Capitol, Prisons and Parody
8:40 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Gov. Faces Decision on Third Grade Retention Bill

This Week in Oklahoma Politics KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the governor choosing to sign or veto a bill bringing parents and educators into the decision of reading retention for 3rd graders, concrete is falling into offices at the State Capitol, the governor approves a $13M supplemental for the Department of Corrections and the co-founder of the Sooner Tea Party creates a parody website poking fun at the senator he's accused of blackmailing.

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