KOSU Music
6:00 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

KOSU Music: Sharon Van Etten, Braid & Hercules and Love Affair

Sharon Van Etten
Credit Dusdin Condren

LOOKatOKC pop music columnist Matt Carney joins host Ryan LaCroix every week to discuss music news and new music releases during All Things Considered on KOSU.

This week, we talk about new music from singer/songwriter Sharon Van Etten, emo-rockers Braid and electro-house group Hercules and Love Affair.


Read more
Code Switch
8:54 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Oklahoma's Latino Community Prepares For The Next Tornado

Gloria and Francisco Sanchez stand in front of their new ranch house, still under construction a year after a tornado destroyed their last home in Moore, Okla.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

A devastating EF-5 tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., a year ago Tuesday. Just 11 days later, another twister ravaged the Oklahoma City metro area.

Nine of the 23 people who died as a result of the second storm were members of the local Latino community. Their deaths have sparked efforts to better prepare Hispanic families for storms.

On a windy afternoon in Oklahoma City, American Red Cross volunteer Ivelisse Cruz hands out stickers to families at the Children's Day Festival.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:46 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite A History Of Twisters, Moore, Okla., Keeps Growing

Max Alvarez (left) and Hollan Corliss construct a new home in Moore, Okla., to replace one that was destroyed in May 2013. More than 300 new homes have been built since the tornado, in addition to the 1,100 that are being rebuilt.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:08 pm

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

Read more
One Year Since the Devastating EF5 Twister
8:40 am
Tue May 20, 2014

JenX: Remembering the Moore Tornado

Today marks one year since an EF5 tornado killed 25 people and devastated communities in southwest Oklahoma City and Moore.

Jennifer Lindsey McClintock has this remembrance in this week’s JenX.

Jennifer is an Oklahoma City native who works in marketing and public relations. You can reach her on twitter at @jeninthe405.

Read more
Water Quality and Ecology
7:42 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Streams Removed from Impaired Waters List Because of Better Farming

Bird Creek in northeast Oklahoma is one of nine streams no longer considered impaired due to high turbidity.
Credit GRANGER MEADOR / FLICKR

The drought goes on, and resources are strained, but there is some positive news to report about Oklahoma’s water.

Read more
Term limits spells the end for some at the Capitol
8:40 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Lawmakers Say Goodbye in This Week's 23rd & Lincoln

Lawmakers hope to be done with business this Friday. Because of term limits this could be the final weekend for some of them.

Here’s Marie Price with this week’s 23rd and Lincoln.

You can find more of Marie’s insights on the capitol jrlr.net.

Read more
Oklahoma Tornado Project
8:22 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Neighbors Find Comfort In Community After 2013 Moore Tornado

Tornado Survivors Alise Newby and Micah Moody find comfort in being neighbors after their homes were destroyed May 20, 2013
Credit Kate Carlton / Oklahoma Tornado Project

One year ago this week, a deadly EF-5 tornado swept through Moore, Oklahoma, taking the lives of 24 people and destroying over 11-hundred homes. For many people, this week marks a painful reminder of the damage. For others, the year anniversary is an opportunity to put the devastation behind them with the support of their peers. Kate Carlton reports. 

Read more
NPR Ed
6:03 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Why Education Is The Most Important Revolution Of Our Time

Everything I needed to know about learning, I learned in preschool?
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:37 pm

Learning is something people, like other animals, do whenever our eyes are open. Education, though, is uniquely human, and right now it's at an unusual point of flux.

By some accounts, education is a $7 trillion global industry ripe for disruption. Others see it as almost a sacred pursuit — a means of nurturing developing minds while preserving tradition. Around the world, education means equal rights and opportunity. People risk their lives for it every day.

Read more
Local News
12:11 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Anthropologist Who Identified Mass Graves Dies

Clyde Snow in 1986.
Credit David Longstreet / Associated Press

Clyde Snow, a forensic anthropologist who worked on cases ranging from the assassination of President John F. Kennedy to mass graves in Argentina, has died. He was 86.

Read more
Interviews
10:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

Hortense McClinton graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s and became the first black professor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Howard University

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 4:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

Read more

Pages