Economy
3:34 am
Mon February 9, 2015

Oil Price Dip, Global Slowdown Create Crosscurrents For U.S.

Oil pumpjacks are seen in McKenzie County in western North Dakota. Cuts in production and energy company payrolls will cost the U.S. economy up to $150 billion, economist David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors projects.
Matthew Brown AP

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 8:48 am

Continued job growth has boosted prospects for the U.S. economy, but it continues to face some tricky crosswinds. The big drop in oil prices and a stronger dollar both help the economy and hurt it. Add to that the recent slowdown in global growth.

Lots of economists have suggested the big drop in oil prices is a gift to consumers that will propel the economy. David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors is one of them. He argues that cheaper oil will ultimately be a positive.

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Code Switch
10:03 pm
Sun February 8, 2015

Civil Rights Attorneys Sue Ferguson Over 'Debtors Prisons'

Tonya DeBerry (center) and her children, Herbert Nelson and Allison Nelson, have all been held in Ferguson and Jennings jails for unpaid traffic tickets.
Joseph Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 8:06 am

In a new challenge to police practices in Ferguson, Mo., a group of civil rights lawyers is suing the city over the way people are jailed when they fail to pay fines for traffic tickets and other minor offenses.

The lawsuit, filed Sunday night on the eve of the six-month anniversary of the police shooting of Michael Brown, alleges that the city violates the Constitution by jailing people without adequately considering whether they were indigent and, as a result, unable to pay.

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Music Interviews
5:46 am
Sun February 8, 2015

JD McPherson: A Walk On The Psych Side Of Early Rock 'N' Roll

JD McPherson's latest album is Let the Good Times Roll.
Kelly Kerr Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 11:41 am

JD McPherson says there's no contest for the best record ever made: Little Richard's "Keep A-Knockin'." With that as his touchstone, it's no wonder that McPherson's latest album, Let the Good Times Roll, sounds the way it does — and yet there's something besides homage going on in the music. The roots rocker says that for his sophomore release, he wanted to make what he calls "'50s psychedelic."

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Sat February 7, 2015

Adnan Syed, Subject Of 'Serial' Podcast, Granted Appeal

An undated photo provided by Yusuf Syed shows his brother, Adnan Syed. Adnan Syed, now 33, was the subject of a popular public radio podcast that raised questions about his guilt. A Maryland court on Saturday granted his request for an appeal.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 3:41 pm

The subject of the popular public radio "Serial" podcast, who was convicted as a teenager 15 years ago in the murder of his ex-girlfriend, has been granted an appeal.

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has granted the request for review from Adnan Syed, whose case has been examined in-depth in the podcasts, which raised questions about his guilt.

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TED Radio Hour
10:44 am
Fri February 6, 2015

How Did An Obese City Lose A Million Pounds?

Hear the radio version of Mayor Cornett's TED Talk here.

About Mick Cornett's TED Talk

Mayor Mick Cornett realized that, to make Oklahoma City a great place to live, it had to become healthier and cope with gluttony. He explains step-by-step how the city dropped a collective million pounds.

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This Week in Oklahoma Politics
8:50 am
Fri February 6, 2015

The 2015 Legislature Kicks Off at the Capitol

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the State of the State Address given by Governor Fallin to kick off the 2015 legislative session as well as her executive budget.

Also, the trio discusses two bill killed early in the session without getting a hearing: the so-called "hoodie bill" and a bill by Representative Sally Kern allowing businesses to discriminate against homosexuals.

Finally, they look at the decision by the Tulsa School Board to hire Deborah Gist as its new superintendent.

Headlines
8:39 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Headlines: Flu Deaths, The Lottery & Turnpike Speed Limit

Headlines for Friday, February 5, 2015:

  • The number of Oklahomans hospitalized from the flu breaks records as the death toll rises. (NewsOK)

  • Changes could come to the lottery. (Journal Record)

  • The decline in oil prices is impacting Oklahoma’s economy. (NewsOK)

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The Salt
7:13 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

Are Farmers Market Sales Peaking? That Might Be Good For Farmers

A customer shops for produce at the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market on March 27th, 2014 in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 8:25 am

After more than a decade of explosive growth, sales of local food at U.S. farmers' markets are slowing. A January report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that while more farmers are selling directly to consumers, local food sales at farmers markets, farm stands and through community supported agriculture have lost some momentum.

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Business
5:48 pm
Thu February 5, 2015

Planning Through Oil Booms Helps Small Producers Weather The Busts

Tracy Perryman is production manager for his family's small oil company in Luling, Texas. B.J.P. Inc. owns 116 wells that, combined, produce about 100 barrels a day.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 10:55 am

Hard times have hit the oil fields. A barrel of West Texas Intermediate crude has dropped from a high of over $100 to less than $50. But Tracy Perryman, a small oilman in Luling, Texas, has learned how to survive the lean times.

Oil companies that take on a lot of debt sometimes don't survive the downturns. But veterans of oil busts have learned how to plan for the inevitable price plunges.

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Politics
10:05 am
Thu February 5, 2015

5 Things The Vaccine Debacle Reveals About The 2016 Presidential Field

Sen. Rand Paul tweeted this photo, writing "Ironic: Today I am getting my booster vaccine. Wonder how the liberal media will misreport this?"
Twitter

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 7:19 pm

As the measles outbreak continues to spread, political leaders with an eye on the White House in 2016 spent much of the week jumping into, and then trying to bail themselves out of, the vaccine debate.

Some brushed the issue off as an unnecessary media circus, but it's worth taking a look at its deeper political meaning. Here are five things the vaccine politics kerfuffle of 2015 tells us about the emerging field of presidential candidates for 2016.

1. Vaccination politics are a problem for Republicans — not Democrats.

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