Station News
1:38 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

KOSU Adds Reporter; Names Morning Edition Host

KOSU welcomed Emily Wendler to the KOSU broadcast team on February 4. Emily is a native of Cincinnati, Ohio with degrees in Geology and Journalism from the University of Cincinnati and a graduate degree in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism from the University of Montana. She is a radio storyteller who excels in the development of investigative and explanatory pieces and in the analysis of data to tell stories. Emily will be based at the KOSU studios in Oklahoma City and her initial focus will be the future of education in our state.

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Premiere On Film Row
12:30 pm
Mon February 9, 2015

Kierston White to Perform in KOSU's OKC Studios

Devon Ray

On Friday, February 20 at 8pm, KOSU hosts singer/songwriter Kierston White in our Oklahoma City performance studio, as part of Premiere on Film Row.

The Norman musician plays a mixture of country and folk music, which is shown on her 2014 album, Don't Write Love Songs.

  • For a chance to win tickets to this exclusive event, e-mail us at tickets@kosu.org.

Politics
8:19 am
Mon February 9, 2015

The Growing Fines and Fees for Oklahomans Breaking Laws

For more than two decades, Oklahoma has turned to fines and fees instead of state appropriations to fund the court system.

In the second part of a three-part series with Oklahoma Watch, OPMX’s Kate Carlton Greer says the debt former prisoners now face has becoming increasingly burdensome as the state has grown more and more reluctant to raise taxes.

The roots of Oklahoma’s crime-funded court system start back in 1992 with State Question 640.

The public was mad about tax hikes, so they passed a referendum making it nearly impossible for lawmakers to raise taxes.

Legislators then began turning to other ways to pad the state budget, like fines and fees.

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Headlines
8:01 am
Mon February 9, 2015

Headlines: Fewer Tests, Tuesday Voting & Thunder Wins

Headlines for Monday, February 9, 2015:

  • Oklahoma’s new superintendent ends field testing in state schools. (Tulsa World)

  • Membership in unions is declining. (Journal Record)

  • While GOP led states are finding ways to use Medicaid expansion to help uninsured people, Oklahoma leaders refuse to move forward. (NewsOK)
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Economy
3:34 am
Mon February 9, 2015

Oil Price Dip, Global Slowdown Create Crosscurrents For U.S.

Oil pumpjacks are seen in McKenzie County in western North Dakota. Cuts in production and energy company payrolls will cost the U.S. economy up to $150 billion, economist David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors projects.
Matthew Brown AP

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 8:48 am

Continued job growth has boosted prospects for the U.S. economy, but it continues to face some tricky crosswinds. The big drop in oil prices and a stronger dollar both help the economy and hurt it. Add to that the recent slowdown in global growth.

Lots of economists have suggested the big drop in oil prices is a gift to consumers that will propel the economy. David Kotok of Cumberland Advisors is one of them. He argues that cheaper oil will ultimately be a positive.

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Code Switch
10:03 pm
Sun February 8, 2015

Civil Rights Attorneys Sue Ferguson Over 'Debtors Prisons'

Tonya DeBerry (center) and her children, Herbert Nelson and Allison Nelson, have all been held in Ferguson and Jennings jails for unpaid traffic tickets.
Joseph Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 8:06 am

In a new challenge to police practices in Ferguson, Mo., a group of civil rights lawyers is suing the city over the way people are jailed when they fail to pay fines for traffic tickets and other minor offenses.

The lawsuit, filed Sunday night on the eve of the six-month anniversary of the police shooting of Michael Brown, alleges that the city violates the Constitution by jailing people without adequately considering whether they were indigent and, as a result, unable to pay.

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Music Interviews
5:46 am
Sun February 8, 2015

JD McPherson: A Walk On The Psych Side Of Early Rock 'N' Roll

JD McPherson's latest album is Let the Good Times Roll.
Kelly Kerr Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 11:41 am

JD McPherson says there's no contest for the best record ever made: Little Richard's "Keep A-Knockin'." With that as his touchstone, it's no wonder that McPherson's latest album, Let the Good Times Roll, sounds the way it does — and yet there's something besides homage going on in the music. The roots rocker says that for his sophomore release, he wanted to make what he calls "'50s psychedelic."

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The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Sat February 7, 2015

Adnan Syed, Subject Of 'Serial' Podcast, Granted Appeal

An undated photo provided by Yusuf Syed shows his brother, Adnan Syed. Adnan Syed, now 33, was the subject of a popular public radio podcast that raised questions about his guilt. A Maryland court on Saturday granted his request for an appeal.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 3:41 pm

The subject of the popular public radio "Serial" podcast, who was convicted as a teenager 15 years ago in the murder of his ex-girlfriend, has been granted an appeal.

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals has granted the request for review from Adnan Syed, whose case has been examined in-depth in the podcasts, which raised questions about his guilt.

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TED Radio Hour
10:44 am
Fri February 6, 2015

How Did An Obese City Lose A Million Pounds?

Hear the radio version of Mayor Cornett's TED Talk here.

About Mick Cornett's TED Talk

Mayor Mick Cornett realized that, to make Oklahoma City a great place to live, it had to become healthier and cope with gluttony. He explains step-by-step how the city dropped a collective million pounds.

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This Week in Oklahoma Politics
8:50 am
Fri February 6, 2015

The 2015 Legislature Kicks Off at the Capitol

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the State of the State Address given by Governor Fallin to kick off the 2015 legislative session as well as her executive budget.

Also, the trio discusses two bill killed early in the session without getting a hearing: the so-called "hoodie bill" and a bill by Representative Sally Kern allowing businesses to discriminate against homosexuals.

Finally, they look at the decision by the Tulsa School Board to hire Deborah Gist as its new superintendent.

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