Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Why City of Hugo Hasn’t Seen One Cent of Record Settlement Over Improperly Treated Drinking Water

Oklahoma’s primary environmental agency made a private contractor pay just under $1 million earlier in a settlement over improperly treated water in a small city in southern Oklahoma. But the state’s budget shortfall swallowed up the money before the city of Hugo had a chance to use it. By early 2015, the state Department of Environmental Quality had detected problems with the way UK-based Severn Trent was treating the water in Hugo. Later that year, a Journal Record report exposed the...
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WATCH: Herman Lookout On Revitalizing The Osage Language

Herman "Mogri" Lookout is the master language teacher for the Osage Nation in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. He's studied the language for forty years and helped revitalize the written portion of it by creating an orthography. Language teachers and experts from all over Native America say that an orthography is a way to reclaim your sovereignty. Lookout also worked with developers to create Osage for Unicode. Because of that, Osages all over the world can write and text in the language. He says...
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Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Supporters of a state question that would change Oklahoma’s alcohol laws launched their campaign today Wednesday. The group Yes On 792 is advocating on behalf of a ballot questionthat would allow convenience stores to sell full strength beer and wine. Liquor stores would be able to sell cold beer.

Oklahoma’s four primary environmental agencies have lost more than $15 million in state appropriations and tens of millions of dollars in legislatively directed reductions to revolving funds, OETA reports.

John Hinckley Jr., 35-years after he tried to kill a president, has won his freedom.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has granted a request for Hinckley to leave the mental hospital where he's resided for decades, to go live full-time with his elderly mother in Williamsburg, Va.

Headlines for Wednesday, July 27, 2016:

  • The Oklahoma Democratic delegation helps make history with the nomination of Hilary Clinton. (NewsOK)

  • Oklahoma Democrats still love former President Bill Clinton despite Congressional losses. (NewsOK)

The Tuesday night session of the Democratic convention was really three events, each with its own atmosphere and impact, but all contributing to a single theme: The Clintons are back.

The City of Edmond passed a resolution Monday night opposing a ballot initiative this fall that would raise Oklahoma’s sales tax by 1 percent to pay for education.

The tax hike would raise about $615 million per year for common and higher education in the state, but Edmond city leaders are worried it would hinder economic development. Oklahoma is the only state in the U.S. where cities and towns rely on local sales taxes as their primary source of revenue.

Thanks to Current for featuring our Native reporting project, Invisible Nations!

Headlines for Tuesday, June 26, 2016:

  • Democratic delegates from Oklahoma are entering day two of the National Convention in Philadelphia. (NewsOK)

  • The leader of the Cherokee Nation is coming out in support of Hillary Clinton. (NewsOK)

Democrats have become accustomed to having the best speech at their quadrennial convention given by someone named Obama. This year, that person might also be named Michelle.

Hers was not the keynote, nor the most anticipated, nor the longest speech of the night. But it mesmerized and subdued the raucous and rebellious crowd, focusing the enormous energy of Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Arena just where convention organizers had hoped — on Hillary Clinton.

For Michelle Obama, this election is about the kids. On the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, the first lady wove her vision for the next generation with her hope for the next president.

"This election, and every election, is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives," she said, adding that Hillary Clinton is the only candidate "who I trust with that responsibility."

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

State officials are considering what to do with $140.8 million dollars that was cut from state agencies in the middle of last fiscal year, but can now be spent. The money is available because General Revenue Fund reductions required by the FY 2016’s midyear revenue failure were deeper than necessary.

Governor Fallin said in a press release that she is considering using the money to fund teacher pay raises.

The City of Edmond passed a resolution Monday night opposing a ballot initiative this fall that would raise Oklahoma’s sales tax by 1 percent to pay for education.

The tax hike would raise about $615 million per year for common and higher education in the state, but Edmond city leaders are worried it would hinder economic development. Oklahoma is the only state in the U.S. where cities and towns rely on local sales taxes as their primary source of revenue.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

After months of debate, the Oklahoma City Public School Board voted to expand KIPP Charter Schools at Monday night’s board meeting. But the expansion will not go as originally planned.

KIPP currently runs a middle school out of F.D. Moon Academy, and has been fighting to extend their rigorous academic model within the district. The charter school proposed starting an elementary school in Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary and hoped to share space with Douglass High School as well. However, Superintendent Aurora Lora says a task force will do more research to decide the locations.

More Education News
A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.

Weeknights with Ferris

Hear Ferris O'Brien every weeknight, from 9 p.m. to midnight, on The Spy.