Supreme Court Rejects Appeal From Jim Thorpe's Sons Over Reburial

The Supreme Court has rejected an appeal from Indian tribes and Jim Thorpe's sons to move the remains of the athletic great from Pennsylvania to Oklahoma. The justices on Monday left in place a court ruling that ordered Thorpe's body to remain in the Pennsylvania town that bears his name. Thorpe's two surviving sons, and the Sac and Fox Nation have been seeking to bury Thorpe on American Indian land in Oklahoma. Thorpe was a football, baseball and track star who won the decathlon and...
Read More
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Tri-State Mining District in northeastern Oklahoma’s Ottawa County was once the world’s largest source of lead and zinc. The mines had closed by the 1970s, but pernicious pollution still plagues what is now known as the Tar Creek superfund site.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Oklahoma Department of Corrections

The latest on the confusion over Oklahoma's supply of lethal injection drugs, which prompted Gov. Mary Fallin to issue a last-minute execution stay for Richard Glossip (all times local):

2:15 p.m.

Oklahoma's attorney general says the state should delay all scheduled executions while it reviews how it received the wrong drug as it prepared to lethally inject an inmate.

Officials say a young elephant has died unexpectedly at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

The zoo said in a statement that 4-year-old Asian elephant Malee died early Thursday. The zoo says zookeepers noticed that Malee was moving slower than normal on Wednesday, but the elephant was eating and acting normal otherwise.

Zookeepers noticed discoloration in the elephant's mouth at about 4:30 p.m. Wednesday and began treating Malee for elephant endotheliotropic herpes virus, though that has not been confirmed as the animal's cause of death.

Headlines for Thursday, October 1,  2015:

  • Governor Fallin stays Richard Glossip’s execution. (NewsOK)

  • Tulsa Sheriff plans to resign. (Tulsa World)

  • Deputy involved in the death of Eric Harris resigns. (Tulsa World)

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Oklahoma Department of Corrections

The latest on the scheduled execution of an Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip, who was convicted of ordering the 1997 beating death of his boss but claims he was framed by the actual killer (all times are local):

5:15 p.m.

Oklahoma inmate Richard Glossip said he was still in his holding cell when he learned that Gov. Mary Fallin was issuing a last-minute postponement of his scheduled execution.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

More than 500 Oklahoma employees of Chesapeake Energy are out of a job following the latest layoffs Sept. 29th, as oil prices stay below $50 a barrel. Gasoline is cheap, but that relief at the pump can fuel widespread worry about Oklahoma’s oil and gas-reliant economy.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City band Tallows.

Tallows' aptly titled second album, Waist Deep, is full of water wordplay, with phrases like "drowning in excuses" and "wash it all clean" weaving through the lyrics. Continuing with that theme, the Oklahoma City band played its album-release show a few weeks ago in an empty swimming pool at a historic Presbyterian church. Local crowds are partial to Tallows, too, as the band's lush, frenetic sounds have been triggering rousing singalongs and dancing masses at its live shows. Pulling from influences like Modest Mouse, American Football and Pinback, Tallows' songs blur the space between math rock and electronic rock. But if you're not ready to make a decision on Tallows just yet, that's okay. Jump in halfway — the water's fine. —Ryan LaCroix, KOSU's The Spy

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Jarred Geller uses punk rock to teach his preschoolers about shapes and geography.

“If I play ‘Wheels on the Bus’ it’s hard for them to get invested in that,” he said.

But with catchy, poppy hooks, and fist-pumping riffs, the 5-year-olds are all in.

Geller started his "Punk Rock Preschool" at Eugene Field Elementary in Oklahoma City last January. He knew that fun and play were essential to young students, so he wrote some songs to incorporate rocking out into his lesson plans.