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Invisible injury: Beyond PTSD [illustrated story]

Filed by KOSU News in Public Insight Network.
June 22, 2013

Editor’s note: Over the last few months, the Public Insight Network has been talking to veterans about their experiences moving on from war.

symbolia-wordmark_WEBWe’ve turned our attention to the idea of moral injury and the limits of the PTSD diagnosis in explaining what happens to many people who go through the experience of war. To better explain moral injury, we collaborated with public radio station WBUR and Symbolia, a tablet magazine of illustrated journalism, to produce a comic book that describes and defines the topic.

Written by Jeff Severns Guntzel/PIN  |  Illustration by Andy Warner/Symbolia  |  Reporting by Martha Bebinger/WBUR and Samara Freemark/PIN.


 

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About Symbolia | Symbolia merges comic books, journalism, and interactive content. We’re making the news into art. Available on iPad, Kindle, and PDF

 

 

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One Response to “Invisible injury: Beyond PTSD [illustrated story]”

  1. Leila Levinson says:

    I applaud this project to broaden people's understanding of war's injuries. Having grown up with a father who was a WWII veteran, I have intimate knowledge of the subtleties trauma's aftermath can have. My father was a very successful surgeon, adored by his patients. But his private life greatly differed from his public one. At home he was silent, distant, aloof, emotionally unavailable. He never told me he loved me, rarely hugged me. And I have met scores of other children of WWII veterans who say the same things about their fathers.

    Our fathers never spoke about their war. But we children have begun to research what their experiences involved. While our fathers did not kill civilians, did not see themselves as monsters, did not feel betrayed by their government or military, they witnessed horror. My father was among the liberators of a Nazi concentration camp. I have deduced that he, like many fellow liberators I have spoken with, lost his faith. They lived having to constantly hide from terror, never knowing peace.

    This is another aspect of moral injury. And it reverberates throughout a family, becoming the children's inheritance. War disfigures all of us.

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