Current Weather
The Spy FM

How Many Calories Do Olympic Athletes Need? It Depends

Filed by KOSU News in Health.
July 25, 2012

Food, as we so often note on this blog, means a lot of different things to different people. To Olympic athletes, food is fuel for exceptional athletic performance. But there’s a surprising amount of variety in just how much fuel elite athletes need.

Anyone who followed Michael Phelps’ astonishing performance in the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games surely will remember one of the secrets of his success: Consuming as many as 12,000 calories in a day.

Of course, unlike the rest of us average folk who spend most of our time sitting and need only 1,600 to 3,000 calories, Phelps burned his 12,000 calories easily, churning through the water at tremendous speed for hours on end.

Swimmers like Phelps aren’t the only athletes who pound eggs, pancakes, and pasta before competition — cyclists, marathon runners and rowers are also known to do some serious carbohydrate loading to fuel their super intense, continuous activity.

But don’t expect to see an Olympic wrestler or gymnast with a crowded tray in the Team USA cafeteria. They’re more likely to be eating a peanut butter sandwich and some fruit.

That’s because these athletes restrict what they eat right before go time, says Nanna Meyer, senior sport dietitian for the U.S. Olympic Committee and a professor of sports nutrition at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. (Some of these athletes of restrict so much that they cross the line into eating disorders.)

They’re at the other end of a pretty broad spectrum of what Olympians consume before competition. Meyer helped us put together the table below to show that the number of calories athletes need depends a lot on the sport. How much muscle mass they have and their weight also matters.

Endurance athletes are competing for hours, while basketball players go hard for a shorter period of time. Gymnasts, meanwhile, are stopping and going. Weight-lifters and shot putters harness a lot of energy for a very short burst.

Meyer and her team are responsible for making sure the athletes have the food they need while they’re in London. They’ve figured out what to put on the menu by talking to the athletes about what they want and need to eat.

But that doesn’t mean they have all the data they’d like.

“We don’t have great data on many sports on energy expenditure because we can’t measure it,” Meyer tells The Salt. She says that’s because the methods available — indirect calorimetry and doubly labeled water — could interfere with training.

Instead, she asks athletes to share their journals where they record their training and what they eat. “If their weights are stable we can assume that what they’re eating reflects their energy balance. We can learn a lot from talking to them,” she says. [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]

Leave a Reply

1PM to 2PM Seasonal Shows

Seasonal Shows

Listen Live Now!

2PM to 4PM The Sandbox

The Sandbox

View the program guide!

4PM to 5PM Weekend All Things Considered

Weekend All Things Considered

View the program guide!

Upcoming Events in your area (Submit your event today!)

Streaming audio and podcasts

Stream KOSU on your smartphone

Phone Streaming

SmartPhone listening options on this page are intended for many iPhones, Blackberries, etc. with low-cost software applications available to listen to our full-time web streams, both News on KOSU-1 and Classical on KOSU-2.

Learn more about our complete range of streaming services

We're perfecting the patient experience - Stillwater Medical Center