Current Weather
The Spy FM

Sports Journalism Is The Goooaal At Argentine School

Filed by KOSU News in World News.
February 11, 2012

Every day, from early morning until late at night, the Superior School of Sports Journalism in Buenos Aires is packed. And most of its 600 students hope to spend their working lives covering sports.

For years, Roberto Bermudez has been teaching in the ornate mansion that houses the school.

“Many have been frustrated athletes, whom I always tell, ‘Here we don’t make athletes, we make journalists. You have the opportunity to be a journalist,’ ” Bermudez says.

And in Argentina, where the people are mad for sports, and soccer in particular, there are plenty of opportunities for sportswriters and broadcasters, which has spawned an educational industry of sorts.

While a big U.S. city like Chicago may have two baseball teams, Buenos Aires and its suburbs have a dozen first division soccer clubs, each with its own stadium, fan base and radio station. Then there’s pro basketball, horse racing, the tennis circuit and even professional volleyball.

Bermudez says it’s an environment that’s helped the sports-reporting schools flourish.

“I do not know if there is any other place in the world where there are so many schools,” Bermudez says of the sports-reporting academies.

A Dozen Academies

Indeed, in Buenos Aires alone there are about a dozen such institutions. Each year they churn out hundreds of sportswriters, broadcasters, camera operators, Web designers and sports analysts.

In Juan Carlos Peralta’s popular class, the focus is on the intricacies of soccer: the strategies, the plays, how defense is played and goals are scored. Peralta is a perfect teacher — he still plays professional soccer for a club just outside Buenos Aires. He’s also a graduate of the school.

“I try to use my experience as a player to teach the kids, and from my experience working with different coaches and teams in my sports career,” Peralta says. “I teach them the basic concepts of soccer and so that they learn how to watch soccer.”

The central idea at the school is to teach students to cover every aspect of sports — to write up game summaries fast and photograph the big play, and also to work as play-by-play men, the guys who have that distinctive way of announcing a gooooooaaaaaaal!

On a recent night at the school, the focus of a mock sports radio program is on the delivery of sports news with peppy banter.

Diego Galanternik, 20, does it with verve, talking about the latest in the soccer world. Like a lot of the students, he’s been crazy about sports since boyhood — so crazy about it that he’s a reserve on a professional soccer club.

“My family always said to me, soccer isn’t everything because those who get to the top are so few,” says Galanternik. “And so I had to be prepared for something else in my life.” [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]

Leave a Reply

9PM to 12AM The Night Shift

The Night Shift

All of our hosts live and breathe the lifestyle of their music genre, but none define it like David Goad, host of the Darkwave show, The Night Shift. He has a degree in guitar performance from the Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma and is the lead vocalist for two bands, Of the Tower and Kali Ra.

Listen Live Now!

12AM to 5AM The Spy

The Spy

An eclectic mix of the Spy's library of more than 10,000 songs curated by Ferris O'Brien.

View the program guide!

Upcoming Events in your area (Submit your event today!)

Streaming audio and podcasts

Stream KOSU on your smartphone

Phone Streaming

SmartPhone listening options on this page are intended for many iPhones, Blackberries, etc. with low-cost software applications available to listen to our full-time web streams, both News on KOSU-1 and Classical on KOSU-2.

Learn more about our complete range of streaming services

We're perfecting the patient experience - Stillwater Medical Center